Mary Meditated on All These Things in Her Heart

There are two types of incomplete or interrupted motherhood. One is the old one which we know: early termination of the pregancy. This happens when a woman conceives a life but does not give birth to it because, in the meantime, either for natural causes or the sin of men, the child dies. Until a short time ago this was the only known form of incomplete motherhood.

Today, however, we know another which consists, on the contrary, in giving birth to a child without having conceived it. This happens when child is first conceived in a test tube and then inserted into the womb of a woman. In some terrible and squalid cases, the womb is borrowed, sometimes rented, to bear a human life conceived elsewhere. In this case, that which the woman gives birth to does not come from her, is not “first conceived in her heart.”

Unfortunately, also on the spiritual plane there are these two sad possibilities. There are those who conceive Jesus without giving birth to him. Such are those who welcome the word without putting it into practice, those who have one spiritual abortion after another, formulating plans for conversion which are then systematically forgotten and abandoned at the halfway point; they behave toward the word as hasty observers who see their faces in a mirror and then go away immediately forgetting what they looked like (cf. James 1:23-24). In sum, these are those who have faith but not works.

On the other hand, there are those who give birth to Christ without having conceived him. Such are those who do many works, perhaps even good ones, which do not come from the heart, from love of God and right intention, but rather from habit, from hypocrisy, from the desire for their own glory or interests, or simply from the satisfaction of doing something, acting. In sum, these are those who have works but not faith.

Read the whoile reflection

Mary Meditated on All These Things in Her Heart

There are two types of incomplete or interrupted motherhood. One is the old one which we know: early termination of the pregancy. This happens when a woman conceives a life but does not give birth to it because, in the meantime, either for natural causes or the sin of men, the child dies. Until a short time ago this was the only known form of incomplete motherhood.

Today, however, we know another which consists, on the contrary, in giving birth to a child without having conceived it. This happens when child is first conceived in a test tube and then inserted into the womb of a woman. In some terrible and squalid cases, the womb is borrowed, sometimes rented, to bear a human life conceived elsewhere. In this case, that which the woman gives birth to does not come from her, is not “first conceived in her heart.”

Unfortunately, also on the spiritual plane there are these two sad possibilities. There are those who conceive Jesus without giving birth to him. Such are those who welcome the word without putting it into practice, those who have one spiritual abortion after another, formulating plans for conversion which are then systematically forgotten and abandoned at the halfway point; they behave toward the word as hasty observers who see their faces in a mirror and then go away immediately forgetting what they looked like (cf. James 1:23-24). In sum, these are those who have faith but not works.

On the other hand, there are those who give birth to Christ without having conceived him. Such are those who do many works, perhaps even good ones, which do not come from the heart, from love of God and right intention, but rather from habit, from hypocrisy, from the desire for their own glory or interests, or simply from the satisfaction of doing something, acting. In sum, these are those who have works but not faith.

Read the whoile reflection

Britain finishes paying off WWII debt

Sixty years on, we finally pay for the war

On Friday [December 29th] this country [the UK] will make its final repayment on the US$4.33 billion loan given by the United States in 1945. Canada will also receive the last payment on its Can$1.25 billion loan.

Ed Balls, the City minister, told The Times last night that it was a historic moment. “This week we finally honour in full our commitments to the US and Canada for the support they gave us 60 years ago. It was vital support which helped Britain defeat Nazi Germany and secure peace and prosperity in the postwar period. We honour our commitments to them now as they honoured their commitments to us all those years ago.”

While Friday’s payments will close the book on the UK’s Second World War debts, Britain still owes and is owed billions of pounds in relation to loans made and costs incurred during the First World War. However, since a moratorium on all war debts agreed at the height of the Great Depression, no debt repayments have been made to or received from other nations since 1934.

Here’s an example of a good sort of national debt. This continues to benefits British citizens today, so it’s fair that today’s citizen’ bear part of the burden for winning the war their fathers fought and won so they could have their freedom today. Debt for social programs, operating expenses or programs with little future benefit is bad debt; debt for capital expenditures or wars is good debt since future generations will benefit from them.

Has the WWE really sunk this low?

Now, I know better than to expect high standards from the organization formerly known as the World Wrestling Federation. So, if you watch it you can expect to see scantily-clad women, barely bleeped-out obscenities and just a general lack of anything remotely resembling class.

A friend of mine told me he stopped watching when they had a series dealing with one of the female wrestlers being stalked by a peeping tom. I had stopped watching prior to that because I could no longer take the hedonistic and dumber aspects of it.

But, they seem to have reached a low that even I couldn’t expect them to. Last night, Kevin Federline (“K-Fed”) wrestled the current champion John Cena. Not only that, but they had him win the match by making it no disqualifications and having Cena’s current arch-rival put the beat down on him to embarass him and help Federline win.

Is the WWE in such bad straits that they think Federline will help them? Are they really doing that badly? If so, they should just close up shop now.

Today in History – January 2nd

18: Death of Ovid

394: Death of St Macarius

1119: Death of Pope Gelasius II

1492: The leader of the last Arab stronghold in Spain surrendered to Spanish forces loyal to King Ferdinand the Second and Queen Isabella the First.

1788: Georgia ratified the Constitution, the fourth of the original 13 colonies to do so, and was admitted to the union.

1842: The first wire suspension bridge was opened to traffic in Fairmount, Pennsylvania.

1872: Brigham Young, the 71-year-old leader of the Mormon Church was arrested on a charge of bigamy. He had 25 wives.

1893: The first commemorative postage stamps were issued.

1900: Secretary of State John Hay announced the “Open Door Policy” to facilitate trade with China.

1903: President Theodore Roosevelt closes a post office in Indianola, Mississippi for refusing to hire a black postmistress.

1904: U.S. Marines are sent to Santo Domingo to aid the government against rebel forces.

1920: Author Isaac Asimov (writer of over 300 books including Foundation and I, Robot) born

1929: The United States and Canada reached agreement on joint action to preserve Niagara Falls.

1930: President Hoover calls his congressional leaders to discuss the public works program

1938: Chaing Kai-shek gives up Chinese premiership to H.H. Kung.

1942: Japanese forces occupied Manila, forcing U.S. and Philippine forces under Gen. Douglas MacArthur to withdraw to the Bataan peninsula.

1953: Robert Taft of Ohio is elected as U.S. Senate Republican leader.

1959: The Soviet Union launched Lunik-1, the first unmanned spacecraft to travel to the moon.

1960: Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts announced his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination.

1965: The New York Jets signed University of Alabama quarterback Joe Namath for a reported $400,000.

1974: President Nixon signed legislation requiring states to limit highway speeds to 55 miles-an-hour (however, federal speed limits were abolished in 1995).

1980: President Carter asks the Senate to delay the arms treaty ratification in response to Soviet action in Afghanistan.

1988: President Reagan and Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney signed an agreement to lift trade restrictions between their countries.

1990: On Wall Street, the Dow Jones Industrial Average reached a record high, ending the day above 2800 for the first time, at 2800.15.

1991: Sharon Pratt Dixon was sworn in as mayor of Washington DC, becoming the first black woman to head a city of Washington’s size and prominence.

1991: European, Soviet and Arab officials pushed for talks to avert war with Iraq.