Local Priest to be interviewed on EWTN Tonight

Fr. Leonard R. Klein will be interviewed on the EWTN program The Journey Home on Monday , January 29 , 2007 at 8:00 p.m. (That’s tonight!)

Father Klein is a former Lutheran pastor who converted to Catholicism and was ordained a Catholic priest last year. He is currently the only married Catholic priest in the Diocese of Wilmington, and one of only about 100 married priests in the entire country.

Here’s an article from last year about him.
And another article that likely ran in The Dialog last year

Ex-cashier now directs mammoth Acme chain

In her salad days, Judy Spires was as green as it gets, a teenage cashier at an Acme in Westmont, N.J.

Thirty-seven years later, she is president of the regional grocery chain.

“The American dream is still alive and well at the supermarket,” she said. “Any bagger you see could wind up being president of this company.”

But that’s impossible, everyone knows that people in minimum wage jobs are stuck there and can’t possibly advance. We’re told time and again that minimum wage workers have gone without a raise for over a decade!

Read the article

Quote-a-palooza

“[A] Congress with power to do whatever would be for the good of the United States… as they would be the sole judges of the good or evil, it would be also a power to do whatever evil they please.” —Thomas Jefferson

“The one resolution, which was in my mind long before it took the form of a resolution, is the key-note of my life. It is this, always to regard as mere impertinences of fate the handicaps which were placed upon my life almost at the beginning. I resolved that they should not crush or dwarf my soul, but rather be made to blossom, like Aaron’s rod, with flowers.” —Helen Keller

“Marriage in America is undoubtedly less robust than it was 50 years ago. But it is not yet a candidate for the endangered-species list, let alone the ash heap. The Census Bureau reported last spring that by the time they are 30 to 34, a large majority of American men and women—72 percent—have been married. Among Americans 65 and older, fully 96 percent have been married. Yes, the divorce rate is high—17.7 per 1,000 marriages—and many couples live together without getting married. But marriage remains a key institution in American life… The ‘60s, the sexual revolution, no-fault divorce, the rise of single motherhood—there is no question that marriage has been through the wringer… Yet for all the buffeting our most important social institution has taken, it remains a social ideal: Boys and girls still aspire to become husbands and wives.” —Jeff Jacoby

“It is important for all Americans to remember that our Declaration of Independence states that every person has the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It also states that these rights come from our Creator, and that governments are formed to secure these rights for all their citizens. And we believe every human life has value, and we pray for the day when every child is welcome in life and protected into law… As we move forward, we’ve all got to remember that a true culture of life cannot be built by changing laws alone. We’ve all got to work hard to change hearts… The sanctity of life is written in the hearts of all men and women. And so I say, go forth with confidence that a cause rooted in human dignity and appealing to the best instincts of our citizens cannot fail.” —President George W. Bush

“We are a nation that has a government—not the other way around. And this makes us special among the nations of the earth. Our government has no power except that granted to it by the people. It is time to check and reverse the growth of government which shows signs of having grown beyond the consent of the governed.” —Ronald Reagan

“In an era when our media and even our education system exalt emotions, while ignoring facts and logic, perhaps we should not be surprised that so many people explain economics by ‘greed.’ Today there are adults—including educated adults—who explain multimillion-dollar corporate executives’ salaries as being due to ‘greed.’ Think about it: I could become so greedy that I wanted a fortune twice the size of Bill Gates’s—but this greed would not increase my income by one cent. If you want to explain why some people have astronomical incomes, it cannot be simply because of their own desires—whether ‘greedy’ or not—but because of what other people are willing to pay them. The real question, then, is: Why do other people choose to pay corporate executives so much?… Every time oil prices shoot up, there are cries of ‘greed’ and demands by politicians for an investigation of collusion by Big Oil. There have been more than a dozen investigations of oil companies over the years, and none of them has turned up the collusion that is supposed to be responsible for high gas prices. Now that oil prices have dropped big time, does that mean that oil companies have lost their ‘greed’? Or could it all be supply and demand—a cause and effect explanation that seems to be harder for some people to understand than emotions like ‘greed’?” —Thomas Sowell

“To understand why the Founders put war powers in the hands of the Presidency, look no further than the current spectacle in Congress on Iraq. What we are witnessing is a Federalist Papers illustration of criticism and micromanagement without responsibility. Consider the resolution pushed through the Senate Foreign Relations Committee… by Joe Biden and Chuck Hagel, two men who would love to be President… Both men voted for the Iraq War. But with that war proving to be more difficult than they thought, they now want to put themselves on record as opposing any further attempts to win it… In addition to being feckless, all of this is unconstitutional. As Commander-in-Chief, the President has the sole Constitutional authority to manage the war effort. Congress has two explicit war powers: It has the power to declare war, which in the case of Iraq it essentially did with its resolution of 2003. It also has the power to appropriate funds. There is a long and unsettled debate over whether Congress can decide to defund specific military operations once it has created a standing Army. We lean toward those who believe it cannot, but the Founders surely didn’t imagine that Congress could start dictating when and where the 101st Airborne could be deployed once a war is under way.” —The Wall Street Journal

Quote-a-palooza

“[A] Congress with power to do whatever would be for the good of the United States… as they would be the sole judges of the good or evil, it would be also a power to do whatever evil they please.” —Thomas Jefferson

“The one resolution, which was in my mind long before it took the form of a resolution, is the key-note of my life. It is this, always to regard as mere impertinences of fate the handicaps which were placed upon my life almost at the beginning. I resolved that they should not crush or dwarf my soul, but rather be made to blossom, like Aaron’s rod, with flowers.” —Helen Keller

“Marriage in America is undoubtedly less robust than it was 50 years ago. But it is not yet a candidate for the endangered-species list, let alone the ash heap. The Census Bureau reported last spring that by the time they are 30 to 34, a large majority of American men and women—72 percent—have been married. Among Americans 65 and older, fully 96 percent have been married. Yes, the divorce rate is high—17.7 per 1,000 marriages—and many couples live together without getting married. But marriage remains a key institution in American life… The ‘60s, the sexual revolution, no-fault divorce, the rise of single motherhood—there is no question that marriage has been through the wringer… Yet for all the buffeting our most important social institution has taken, it remains a social ideal: Boys and girls still aspire to become husbands and wives.” —Jeff Jacoby

“It is important for all Americans to remember that our Declaration of Independence states that every person has the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It also states that these rights come from our Creator, and that governments are formed to secure these rights for all their citizens. And we believe every human life has value, and we pray for the day when every child is welcome in life and protected into law… As we move forward, we’ve all got to remember that a true culture of life cannot be built by changing laws alone. We’ve all got to work hard to change hearts… The sanctity of life is written in the hearts of all men and women. And so I say, go forth with confidence that a cause rooted in human dignity and appealing to the best instincts of our citizens cannot fail.” —President George W. Bush

“We are a nation that has a government—not the other way around. And this makes us special among the nations of the earth. Our government has no power except that granted to it by the people. It is time to check and reverse the growth of government which shows signs of having grown beyond the consent of the governed.” —Ronald Reagan

“In an era when our media and even our education system exalt emotions, while ignoring facts and logic, perhaps we should not be surprised that so many people explain economics by ‘greed.’ Today there are adults—including educated adults—who explain multimillion-dollar corporate executives’ salaries as being due to ‘greed.’ Think about it: I could become so greedy that I wanted a fortune twice the size of Bill Gates’s—but this greed would not increase my income by one cent. If you want to explain why some people have astronomical incomes, it cannot be simply because of their own desires—whether ‘greedy’ or not—but because of what other people are willing to pay them. The real question, then, is: Why do other people choose to pay corporate executives so much?… Every time oil prices shoot up, there are cries of ‘greed’ and demands by politicians for an investigation of collusion by Big Oil. There have been more than a dozen investigations of oil companies over the years, and none of them has turned up the collusion that is supposed to be responsible for high gas prices. Now that oil prices have dropped big time, does that mean that oil companies have lost their ‘greed’? Or could it all be supply and demand—a cause and effect explanation that seems to be harder for some people to understand than emotions like ‘greed’?” —Thomas Sowell

“To understand why the Founders put war powers in the hands of the Presidency, look no further than the current spectacle in Congress on Iraq. What we are witnessing is a Federalist Papers illustration of criticism and micromanagement without responsibility. Consider the resolution pushed through the Senate Foreign Relations Committee… by Joe Biden and Chuck Hagel, two men who would love to be President… Both men voted for the Iraq War. But with that war proving to be more difficult than they thought, they now want to put themselves on record as opposing any further attempts to win it… In addition to being feckless, all of this is unconstitutional. As Commander-in-Chief, the President has the sole Constitutional authority to manage the war effort. Congress has two explicit war powers: It has the power to declare war, which in the case of Iraq it essentially did with its resolution of 2003. It also has the power to appropriate funds. There is a long and unsettled debate over whether Congress can decide to defund specific military operations once it has created a standing Army. We lean toward those who believe it cannot, but the Founders surely didn’t imagine that Congress could start dictating when and where the 101st Airborne could be deployed once a war is under way.” —The Wall Street Journal

Quote-a-palooza

“[A] Congress with power to do whatever would be for the good of the United States… as they would be the sole judges of the good or evil, it would be also a power to do whatever evil they please.” —Thomas Jefferson

“The one resolution, which was in my mind long before it took the form of a resolution, is the key-note of my life. It is this, always to regard as mere impertinences of fate the handicaps which were placed upon my life almost at the beginning. I resolved that they should not crush or dwarf my soul, but rather be made to blossom, like Aaron’s rod, with flowers.” —Helen Keller

“Marriage in America is undoubtedly less robust than it was 50 years ago. But it is not yet a candidate for the endangered-species list, let alone the ash heap. The Census Bureau reported last spring that by the time they are 30 to 34, a large majority of American men and women—72 percent—have been married. Among Americans 65 and older, fully 96 percent have been married. Yes, the divorce rate is high—17.7 per 1,000 marriages—and many couples live together without getting married. But marriage remains a key institution in American life… The ‘60s, the sexual revolution, no-fault divorce, the rise of single motherhood—there is no question that marriage has been through the wringer… Yet for all the buffeting our most important social institution has taken, it remains a social ideal: Boys and girls still aspire to become husbands and wives.” —Jeff Jacoby

“It is important for all Americans to remember that our Declaration of Independence states that every person has the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It also states that these rights come from our Creator, and that governments are formed to secure these rights for all their citizens. And we believe every human life has value, and we pray for the day when every child is welcome in life and protected into law… As we move forward, we’ve all got to remember that a true culture of life cannot be built by changing laws alone. We’ve all got to work hard to change hearts… The sanctity of life is written in the hearts of all men and women. And so I say, go forth with confidence that a cause rooted in human dignity and appealing to the best instincts of our citizens cannot fail.” —President George W. Bush

“We are a nation that has a government—not the other way around. And this makes us special among the nations of the earth. Our government has no power except that granted to it by the people. It is time to check and reverse the growth of government which shows signs of having grown beyond the consent of the governed.” —Ronald Reagan

“In an era when our media and even our education system exalt emotions, while ignoring facts and logic, perhaps we should not be surprised that so many people explain economics by ‘greed.’ Today there are adults—including educated adults—who explain multimillion-dollar corporate executives’ salaries as being due to ‘greed.’ Think about it: I could become so greedy that I wanted a fortune twice the size of Bill Gates’s—but this greed would not increase my income by one cent. If you want to explain why some people have astronomical incomes, it cannot be simply because of their own desires—whether ‘greedy’ or not—but because of what other people are willing to pay them. The real question, then, is: Why do other people choose to pay corporate executives so much?… Every time oil prices shoot up, there are cries of ‘greed’ and demands by politicians for an investigation of collusion by Big Oil. There have been more than a dozen investigations of oil companies over the years, and none of them has turned up the collusion that is supposed to be responsible for high gas prices. Now that oil prices have dropped big time, does that mean that oil companies have lost their ‘greed’? Or could it all be supply and demand—a cause and effect explanation that seems to be harder for some people to understand than emotions like ‘greed’?” —Thomas Sowell

“To understand why the Founders put war powers in the hands of the Presidency, look no further than the current spectacle in Congress on Iraq. What we are witnessing is a Federalist Papers illustration of criticism and micromanagement without responsibility. Consider the resolution pushed through the Senate Foreign Relations Committee… by Joe Biden and Chuck Hagel, two men who would love to be President… Both men voted for the Iraq War. But with that war proving to be more difficult than they thought, they now want to put themselves on record as opposing any further attempts to win it… In addition to being feckless, all of this is unconstitutional. As Commander-in-Chief, the President has the sole Constitutional authority to manage the war effort. Congress has two explicit war powers: It has the power to declare war, which in the case of Iraq it essentially did with its resolution of 2003. It also has the power to appropriate funds. There is a long and unsettled debate over whether Congress can decide to defund specific military operations once it has created a standing Army. We lean toward those who believe it cannot, but the Founders surely didn’t imagine that Congress could start dictating when and where the 101st Airborne could be deployed once a war is under way.” —The Wall Street Journal

More Commandments

Yesterday at Mass, while I was taking up the collection, I saw something I’d never seen in my more than two decades of ushering. A guy held up a $20 bill and asked me if I had a ten he could take back as change. I was so stunned I just answered his question with a “I don’t know. I don’t keep track of what people put in.” He then reached into the basket and found two fives, dropped the twenty in and sent me on my way.

I told that to another usher, who’s also been ushering a long time, and our associate pastor and neither of them had heard of it, either. Telling my girlfriend that night, we formulated a new (11th?) Commandment: “Thou shalt not make change from the collection basket.”

She then proposed an additional one: “Thou shalt not allow thy cell phone to ring loudly during service.” (She’s Baptist.)

Later, a related occurred to me: “Thou shalt not answer thy cell phone during Mass/service.” (Which I’ve sadly seen a number of times, including by a US Senator.)

So, any other suggestions?

I’ve crossposted this at Friends of Catholic Exchange and will bring the best suggestions from there over here and vice versa.