Occasional Communion

Jeff the Baptist posted yesterday about the likely historical reasons Baptists do not have weekly Communion services. I’m not sure if Baptists believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist or not. (My girlfriend doesn’t, but there are enough different flavors of Baptists that I don’t want to make a blanket statement.)

I was reminded of a story Scot Hahn told in the book he co-authored with his wife “Rome, Sweet Home” which detailed their conversion to Catholicism. Through his study of Scripture and early Christian writing, Hahn came to understand that Christ was truly present in the consecrated Bread and Wine. (He was stunned to see how many early Christians took it for granted and that with all the many theological disputes in the early Church, the Real presence wasn’t one of them.) Anyway, he presented his findings to his congregation (Methodist, IIRC) and they began to have weekly Communion services, a break from their prior practice. After a while of that, a male member of his congregation approached and suggested that by having Communion weekly they weren’t making it less special somehow. Hahn asked him what his reaction would be if his wife suggested they had sexual relations less frequently to keep it special. The point was made.

In the Catholic Church, almost every parish will have Mass at least daily. St Ann’s has it twice a day on weekdays and one Saturday morning Mass. St Anthony’s has it twice daily. Vatican II, in Lumen Gentium, referred to the Eucharist as “the source and summit of the Christian life.” And it makes sense that we see it as such. After all, it is the Body and Blood of our Lord and Savior, and through we participate and receive the blessings of his sacrifice. As Paul asked the Corinthians, “The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ?” (1 Cor 10:16) Given that, how can we not receive it as often as possible? I know I should receive it more than I do, but I’m not a morning person and so I often miss Mass, although I’d like to go more.

Last night, I went to the Embryonic Stem Cell presentation at the University of Delaware and talked to Professor Dermott Mullan who moderated the event and is also the father of a high school classmate of mine who was ordained Christmas Day in Rome. He was telling me how awe inspiring it was that his son, who he gave life to and raised from a baby, can now offer Christ back to God the Father on a daily basis. Can there possibly be any greater experience on earth? I can’t think of one. And that’s why we should pursue Communion on a more frequent basis (while making sure we’re worthy of such Communion): the chance for greater Communion with God is something to be sought as often as possible.

Occasional Communion

Jeff the Baptist posted yesterday about the likely historical reasons Baptists do not have weekly Communion services. I’m not sure if Baptists believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist or not. (My girlfriend doesn’t, but there are enough different flavors of Baptists that I don’t want to make a blanket statement.)

I was reminded of a story Scot Hahn told in the book he co-authored with his wife “Rome, Sweet Home” which detailed their conversion to Catholicism. Through his study of Scripture and early Christian writing, Hahn came to understand that Christ was truly present in the consecrated Bread and Wine. (He was stunned to see how many early Christians took it for granted and that with all the many theological disputes in the early Church, the Real presence wasn’t one of them.) Anyway, he presented his findings to his congregation (Methodist, IIRC) and they began to have weekly Communion services, a break from their prior practice. After a while of that, a male member of his congregation approached and suggested that by having Communion weekly they weren’t making it less special somehow. Hahn asked him what his reaction would be if his wife suggested they had sexual relations less frequently to keep it special. The point was made.

In the Catholic Church, almost every parish will have Mass at least daily. St Ann’s has it twice a day on weekdays and one Saturday morning Mass. St Anthony’s has it twice daily. Vatican II, in Lumen Gentium, referred to the Eucharist as “the source and summit of the Christian life.” And it makes sense that we see it as such. After all, it is the Body and Blood of our Lord and Savior, and through we participate and receive the blessings of his sacrifice. As Paul asked the Corinthians, “The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ?” (1 Cor 10:16) Given that, how can we not receive it as often as possible? I know I should receive it more than I do, but I’m not a morning person and so I often miss Mass, although I’d like to go more.

Last night, I went to the Embryonic Stem Cell presentation at the University of Delaware and talked to Professor Dermott Mullan who moderated the event and is also the father of a high school classmate of mine who was ordained Christmas Day in Rome. He was telling me how awe inspiring it was that his son, who he gave life to and raised from a baby, can now offer Christ back to God the Father on a daily basis. Can there possibly be any greater experience on earth? I can’t think of one. And that’s why we should pursue Communion on a more frequent basis (while making sure we’re worthy of such Communion): the chance for greater Communion with God is something to be sought as often as possible.

Even the Discovery Channel is backing off the Jesus’ Tomb Claims

Is Discovery Burying ‘Lost Tomb’?

Discovery Channel’s controversial James Cameron-produced documentary “The Lost Tomb of Jesus” drew the largest audience for the network in more than a year on Sunday night, but the network has taken several recent steps to downplay the project.

Departing from normal procedures, the cable network didn’t tout its big ratings win. The network also scheduled a last-minute special that harshly criticized its own documentary, and has yanked a planned repeat of “Tomb.”

Although Mr. Leavy said the network stands by the documentary “100 percent,” the company took several unusual steps in the wake of the controversy that could be seen as distancing itself from the content.

Last week, Discovery abruptly scheduled a panel debate to air after the documentary, moderated by Discovery newsman Ted Koppel. Discovery’s announcement of the panel emphasized that Mr. Koppel “has no connection to the production of ‘The Lost Tomb of Jesus'” and that “the panel will explore the filmmakers’ profound assertions and challenge their assumptions and suggested conclusions.”

When the panel discussion aired, guests criticized the documentary as “archaeo-porn” that played fast and loose with the facts.

The day after the March 4 airing, Discovery yanked a planned repeat of “Tomb” from its more hard-news-branded Discovery Times Channel.

“Archaeo-porn”. I like that.

It seems the executives at the Discovery Channel are realizing they got taken in by a series of false claims. If only they had realized prior to pushing such pseudo-history on so many people.

Hat Tip: Jimmy Akin