Quote-a-palooza

“Laws are made for men of ordinary understanding and should, therefore, be construed by the ordinary rules of common sense. Their meaning is not to be sought for in metaphysical subtleties which may make anything mean everything or nothing at pleasure.” —Thomas Jefferson

“The mania for giving the Government power to meddle with the private affairs of cities or citizens is likely to cause endless trouble, through the rivalry of schools and creeds that are anxious to obtain official recognition, and there is great danger that our people will lose our independence of thought and action which is the cause of much of our greatness, and sink into the helplessness of the Frenchman or German who expects his government to feed him when hungry, clothe him when naked, to prescribe when his child may be born and when he may die, and, in time, to regulate every act of humanity from the cradle to the tomb, including the manner in which he may seek future admission to paradise.” —Mark Twain

“Parents should have the same freedom in educating their kids that they have in clothing, housing, and feeding them. You wouldn’t let the government decide what time your kids should go to bed, or which doctor should treat their chicken pox, or how they should spend their summer vacation, or which religion they should be instructed in. On matters serious and not so serious, parents are entrusted with their children’s well-being. Why should schooling be an exception? Get government out of the business of running schools, and a range of alternatives will emerge. Freedom, innovation, and competition will do for education what they do for so much else in American life: increase choices, lower costs, improve performance—and eliminate conflict. So long as education is controlled by the state, the battles and bad blood will continue. With more liberty will come more tolerance—and more resources spent on learning than on litigation.” —Jeff Jacoby

“Unlike our opponents, who find their glee in momentary political leverage, we garnish our strength of purpose from a commitment to ideals that we deeply believe are not only right but that work. Ludwig Von Mises, that great economist, once noted: ‘People must fight for something they want to achieve, not simply reject an evil.’ Well, the conservative movement remains in the ascendancy because we have a bold, forward-looking agenda.” —Ronald Reagan

“Both chambers of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s General Assembly passed a resolution saying government-sanctioned slavery ‘ranks as the most horrendous of all depredations of human rights and violations of our founding ideals in our nation’s history; and… the abolition of slavery was followed by… systematic discrimination, enforced segregation, and other insidious institutions and practices toward Americans of African descent that were rooted in racism, racial bias, and racial misunderstanding.’… The next time the Virginia General Assembly gets into an apologetic mood and wants to pass another resolution aimed at its black citizens, here are my suggestions: The Commonwealth of Virginia apologizes to its black citizens for not protecting them from criminals who prey upon them and make their lives a daily nightmare. The Commonwealth also apologizes for our government-sanctioned school system that delivers fraudulent education, thereby consigning many of its black citizens to the bottom rungs of the economic ladder.” —Walter Williams

“Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but the other day the Rev. Al Gore declared that ‘climate change’ was ‘the most important moral, ethical, spiritual and political issue humankind has ever faced.’ Ever. I believe that was the same day it was revealed that George W. Bush’s ranch in Texas is more environmentally friendly than the Gore mansion in Tennessee. According to the Nashville Electric Service, the Eco-Messiah’s house uses 20 times more electricity than the average American home. The average household consumes 10,656 kilowatt-hours. In 2006, the Gores wolfed down nearly 221,000 kilowatt-hours. Two hundred twenty-one thousand kilowatt-hours? What’s he doing in there? Clamping Tipper to the electrodes and zapping her across the rec room every night? No, no, don’t worry. Al’s massive energy consumption is due entirely to his concern about the way we’re depleting the Earth’s resources. When I say ‘we,’ I don’t mean Al, of course. I mean you—yes, you, Earl Schlub, in the basement apartment at 29 Elm St. You’re irresponsibly depleting the Earth’s resources by using that electric washer when you could be down by the river with the native women beating your loin cloth dry on the rock while singing traditional village work chants all morning long. But up at the Gore mansion—the Nashville Electric Service’s own personal gold mine, the shining Cathedral of St. Al, Tennessee’s very own Palace of Versal—the Reverend Al is being far more environmentally responsible. As his spokesperson attempted to argue, his high energy usage derives from his brave calls for low energy usage. He’s burning up all that electricity by sending out faxes every couple of minutes urging you to use less electricity.” —Mark Steyn

Quote-a-palooza

“Laws are made for men of ordinary understanding and should, therefore, be construed by the ordinary rules of common sense. Their meaning is not to be sought for in metaphysical subtleties which may make anything mean everything or nothing at pleasure.” —Thomas Jefferson

“The mania for giving the Government power to meddle with the private affairs of cities or citizens is likely to cause endless trouble, through the rivalry of schools and creeds that are anxious to obtain official recognition, and there is great danger that our people will lose our independence of thought and action which is the cause of much of our greatness, and sink into the helplessness of the Frenchman or German who expects his government to feed him when hungry, clothe him when naked, to prescribe when his child may be born and when he may die, and, in time, to regulate every act of humanity from the cradle to the tomb, including the manner in which he may seek future admission to paradise.” —Mark Twain

“Parents should have the same freedom in educating their kids that they have in clothing, housing, and feeding them. You wouldn’t let the government decide what time your kids should go to bed, or which doctor should treat their chicken pox, or how they should spend their summer vacation, or which religion they should be instructed in. On matters serious and not so serious, parents are entrusted with their children’s well-being. Why should schooling be an exception? Get government out of the business of running schools, and a range of alternatives will emerge. Freedom, innovation, and competition will do for education what they do for so much else in American life: increase choices, lower costs, improve performance—and eliminate conflict. So long as education is controlled by the state, the battles and bad blood will continue. With more liberty will come more tolerance—and more resources spent on learning than on litigation.” —Jeff Jacoby

“Unlike our opponents, who find their glee in momentary political leverage, we garnish our strength of purpose from a commitment to ideals that we deeply believe are not only right but that work. Ludwig Von Mises, that great economist, once noted: ‘People must fight for something they want to achieve, not simply reject an evil.’ Well, the conservative movement remains in the ascendancy because we have a bold, forward-looking agenda.” —Ronald Reagan

“Both chambers of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s General Assembly passed a resolution saying government-sanctioned slavery ‘ranks as the most horrendous of all depredations of human rights and violations of our founding ideals in our nation’s history; and… the abolition of slavery was followed by… systematic discrimination, enforced segregation, and other insidious institutions and practices toward Americans of African descent that were rooted in racism, racial bias, and racial misunderstanding.’… The next time the Virginia General Assembly gets into an apologetic mood and wants to pass another resolution aimed at its black citizens, here are my suggestions: The Commonwealth of Virginia apologizes to its black citizens for not protecting them from criminals who prey upon them and make their lives a daily nightmare. The Commonwealth also apologizes for our government-sanctioned school system that delivers fraudulent education, thereby consigning many of its black citizens to the bottom rungs of the economic ladder.” —Walter Williams

“Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but the other day the Rev. Al Gore declared that ‘climate change’ was ‘the most important moral, ethical, spiritual and political issue humankind has ever faced.’ Ever. I believe that was the same day it was revealed that George W. Bush’s ranch in Texas is more environmentally friendly than the Gore mansion in Tennessee. According to the Nashville Electric Service, the Eco-Messiah’s house uses 20 times more electricity than the average American home. The average household consumes 10,656 kilowatt-hours. In 2006, the Gores wolfed down nearly 221,000 kilowatt-hours. Two hundred twenty-one thousand kilowatt-hours? What’s he doing in there? Clamping Tipper to the electrodes and zapping her across the rec room every night? No, no, don’t worry. Al’s massive energy consumption is due entirely to his concern about the way we’re depleting the Earth’s resources. When I say ‘we,’ I don’t mean Al, of course. I mean you—yes, you, Earl Schlub, in the basement apartment at 29 Elm St. You’re irresponsibly depleting the Earth’s resources by using that electric washer when you could be down by the river with the native women beating your loin cloth dry on the rock while singing traditional village work chants all morning long. But up at the Gore mansion—the Nashville Electric Service’s own personal gold mine, the shining Cathedral of St. Al, Tennessee’s very own Palace of Versal—the Reverend Al is being far more environmentally responsible. As his spokesperson attempted to argue, his high energy usage derives from his brave calls for low energy usage. He’s burning up all that electricity by sending out faxes every couple of minutes urging you to use less electricity.” —Mark Steyn

Quote of the Day

“Since private and publick Vices, are in Reality, though not always apparently, so nearly connected, of how much Importance, how necessary is it, that the utmost Pains be taken by the Publick, to have the Principles of Virtue early inculcated on the Minds even of children, and the moral Sense kept alive, and that the wise institutions of our Ancestors for these great Purposes be encouraged by the Government. For no people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffusd and Virtue is preservd. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauchd in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders.”

— Samuel Adams (letter to James Warren, 4 November 1775)

Reference: Our Sacred Honor, Bennett, 261

Quote of the Day

“Since private and publick Vices, are in Reality, though not always apparently, so nearly connected, of how much Importance, how necessary is it, that the utmost Pains be taken by the Publick, to have the Principles of Virtue early inculcated on the Minds even of children, and the moral Sense kept alive, and that the wise institutions of our Ancestors for these great Purposes be encouraged by the Government. For no people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffusd and Virtue is preservd. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauchd in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders.”

— Samuel Adams (letter to James Warren, 4 November 1775)

Reference: Our Sacred Honor, Bennett, 261