I am The Hermit

You are The Hermit

Prudence, Caution, Deliberation.

The Hermit points to all things hidden, such as knowledge and inspiration,hidden enemies. The illumination is from within, and retirement from participation in current events.

The Hermit is a card of introspection, analysis and, well, virginity. You do not desire to socialize; the card indicates, instead, a desire for peace and solitude. You prefer to take the time to think, organize, ruminate, take stock. There may be feelings of frustration and discontent but these feelings eventually lead to enlightenment, illumination, clarity.

The Hermit represents a wise, inspirational person, friend, teacher, therapist. This a person who can shine a light on things that were previously mysterious and confusing.

What Tarot Card are You?
Take the Test to Find Out.

Hat Tip: Jeff the Baptist

Quote-a-palooza

“[T]he people are not to be disarmed of their weapons. They are left in full possession of them.” —Zacharia Johnson

“Anybody can become angry, that is easy; but to be angry with the right person, and to the right degree, and at the right time, and for the right purpose, and in the right way, that is not within everybody’s power, that is not easy.” —Aristotle

“How could this great land of plenty produce too few people in the last 30 years? Here is the brutal truth that no one dares to mention: We’re too few because too many of our babies have been killed. Over 45 million since Roe v. Wade in 1973. If those 45 million children had lived, today they would be defending our country, they would be filling our jobs, they would be paying into Social Security. Still, we watch as 3,700 babies are killed every single day in America. It is unbelievable that a nation under God would allow this.” —former Senator Zell Miller

“Not long ago, the United States Senate, by a nigh-unanimous vote, approved the appointment of Lieut. Gen. David Petraeus to command American forces in Iraq. This is the same David Petraeus, Ph.D., who more or less wrote the book on counterinsurgency, having overseen the production of the Army’s new manual on the subject. But even before this general has had a decent chance to put his ideas into effect, the congressional leadership has begun undermining it—by criticizing his request for more troops, setting limits on how much time he’ll be given to show results, and holding back money for the war. Call it Operation Slow Bleed. It’s a gradual process and, if successful, the results won’t be pretty… To quote the president, who must be feeling rather embattled himself these days: ‘This may be the first time in the history of the United States Congress that it has voted to send a new commander into battle and then voted to oppose his plan… to succeed in [that] battle’.” —Paul Greenberg

“The specter our well-meaning liberal friends refuse to face is that their policy of accommodation is appeasement, and appeasement does not give you a choice between peace and war, only between fight or surrender. We are told that the problem is too complex for a simple answer. They are wrong. There is no easy answer, but there is a simple answer. We must have the courage to do what we know is morally right, and this policy of accommodation asks us to accept the greatest possible immorality.” —Ronald Reagan

“In the past, personal loyalty has been more a Democratic thing than a Republican one. Democrats used to like politics more than Republicans, so it’s no surprise they’d like its practitioners more. Republicans used to be conservatives; conservatives think politics is a duty, not a joy. Democrats took their leaders more seriously as personalities, as people. They emotionally invested more in them… Republicans used to be a cooler sort. They got excited by the philosophy, by what the guy would do in office. If he pleased them in these areas, they were more than happy to find he’d lived an interesting and inspiring life, and tell you about it in books. For me it’s good to see Republicans who are loyal to ideas, and not to people. Who are faithful to the cause, and not to people with whom you merely have a history. Who have fidelity to principles, not to political figures, no matter how interesting or compelling they are.” —Peggy Noonan

“[The Democrats’ PAYGO] rules require that whenever the House or the Senate legislatively expands mandatory spending—mostly for entitlements—or reduces taxes, the hit to the budget must be offset by a cut in other mandatory spending, or an increase in other taxes… Paygo was deliberately fashioned in order to make opponents of tax hikes into villains for blocking new entitlements; it also makes it harder to avoid tax hikes and trim government spending. And it lets defenders of discretionary spending off the hook—since under the House paygo rule, increases in discretionary spending do not need to be offset at all. Paygo is a way of diverting attention from the wisdom taught by Milton Friedman: The true burden of government is what it spends—not what it takes in taxes.” —Stephen Entin of the Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation

Quote of the Day

“Far from being rivals or enemies, religion and law are twin sisters, friends, and mutual assistants. Indeed, these two sciences run into each other. The divine law, as discovered by reason and the moral sense, forms an essential part of both.”

— James Wilson

Reference: The Works of James Wilson, McCloskey, ed., 125.

Quote of the Day

“Far from being rivals or enemies, religion and law are twin sisters, friends, and mutual assistants. Indeed, these two sciences run into each other. The divine law, as discovered by reason and the moral sense, forms an essential part of both.”

— James Wilson

Reference: The Works of James Wilson, McCloskey, ed., 125.

Quote of the Day

“Far from being rivals or enemies, religion and law are twin sisters, friends, and mutual assistants. Indeed, these two sciences run into each other. The divine law, as discovered by reason and the moral sense, forms an essential part of both.”

— James Wilson

Reference: The Works of James Wilson, McCloskey, ed., 125.