Quote-a-palooza

“To take from one, because it is thought his own industry… has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who… have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, the guarantee to everyone the free exercise of his industry and the fruits acquired by it.” – Thomas Jefferson

“The collection of taxes which are not absolutely required, which do not beyond reasonable doubt contribute to the public welfare, is only a species of legalized larceny. The wise and correct course to follow in taxation is not to destroy those who have already secured success, but to create conditions under which everyone will have a better chance to be successful.” – Calvin Coolidge

“Common sense told us that when you put a big tax on something, the people will produce less of it. So we cut the people’s tax rates and the people produced more than ever before.”
“Are you entitled to the fruits of your own labor or does government have some presumptive right to spend and spend and spend?”
“The federal government has taken too much tax money from the people, too much authority from the states, and too much liberty with the Constitution.”
“Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.”
“Republicans believe every day is the Fourth of July, but Democrats believe every day is April 15.”
– Ronald Reagan

“[One] ruse is the Democratic-media chorus that the Bush tax cuts must be repealed because they’ve left the Treasury high and dry…[T]ax receipts did plunge earlier this decade from their late-1990s heights, reaching a trough in fiscal 2004 of 16.3% of GDP. The economy was still recovering from the collapse of business investment and the stock market bubble, and no doubt the lower Bush rates played a role in reducing revenue for a time. But the lower rates also provided a spur to incentives that led to a rebound in investment, stock prices and ultimately in economic growth, individual incomes and corporate profits. This produced, in turn, a very sharp rebound in federal tax receipts—to 17.6% of GDP in fiscal 2005 and 18.4% in 2006. The Congressional Budget Office—now run by Democrats—predicts it will reach 18.6% in fiscal 2007. This is slightly above the 40-year historical average of 18.3%… Despite the Bush tax cuts—or we should say because of them—federal revenues are above where they’ve been for most of the last half century. The government is far from starved for cash. What Democrats really don’t want you to know is what will happen to receipts after 2010 if the tax cuts expire… A tax increase of that magnitude could well lead to a recession and a plunge in receipts…[T]he tax increase fuse has now been lit. Do nothing and taxes will rise as much as they have at any one time since World War II. Democrats have made the decision to obscure this burning fuse, and the press corps is ignoring it. But that doesn’t mean the rest of the country has to play along.” – The Wall Street Journal

Quote-a-palooza

“To take from one, because it is thought his own industry… has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who… have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, the guarantee to everyone the free exercise of his industry and the fruits acquired by it.” – Thomas Jefferson

“The collection of taxes which are not absolutely required, which do not beyond reasonable doubt contribute to the public welfare, is only a species of legalized larceny. The wise and correct course to follow in taxation is not to destroy those who have already secured success, but to create conditions under which everyone will have a better chance to be successful.” – Calvin Coolidge

“Common sense told us that when you put a big tax on something, the people will produce less of it. So we cut the people’s tax rates and the people produced more than ever before.”
“Are you entitled to the fruits of your own labor or does government have some presumptive right to spend and spend and spend?”
“The federal government has taken too much tax money from the people, too much authority from the states, and too much liberty with the Constitution.”
“Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.”
“Republicans believe every day is the Fourth of July, but Democrats believe every day is April 15.”
– Ronald Reagan

“[One] ruse is the Democratic-media chorus that the Bush tax cuts must be repealed because they’ve left the Treasury high and dry…[T]ax receipts did plunge earlier this decade from their late-1990s heights, reaching a trough in fiscal 2004 of 16.3% of GDP. The economy was still recovering from the collapse of business investment and the stock market bubble, and no doubt the lower Bush rates played a role in reducing revenue for a time. But the lower rates also provided a spur to incentives that led to a rebound in investment, stock prices and ultimately in economic growth, individual incomes and corporate profits. This produced, in turn, a very sharp rebound in federal tax receipts—to 17.6% of GDP in fiscal 2005 and 18.4% in 2006. The Congressional Budget Office—now run by Democrats—predicts it will reach 18.6% in fiscal 2007. This is slightly above the 40-year historical average of 18.3%… Despite the Bush tax cuts—or we should say because of them—federal revenues are above where they’ve been for most of the last half century. The government is far from starved for cash. What Democrats really don’t want you to know is what will happen to receipts after 2010 if the tax cuts expire… A tax increase of that magnitude could well lead to a recession and a plunge in receipts…[T]he tax increase fuse has now been lit. Do nothing and taxes will rise as much as they have at any one time since World War II. Democrats have made the decision to obscure this burning fuse, and the press corps is ignoring it. But that doesn’t mean the rest of the country has to play along.” – The Wall Street Journal