Anniversary of the Magna Carta

Over on The Corner, Iain Murray points out that today is the anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta. He points out a few provisions that are still valid in English Law, and wonders if they still will be come the 800th anniversary of the document in 2015. Among those he questions is:

FIRST, THAT WE HAVE GRANTED TO GOD, and by this present charter have confirmed for us and our heirs in perpetuity, that the English Church shall be free, and shall have its rights undiminished, and its liberties unimpaired. That we wish this so to be observed, appears from the fact that of our own free will, before the outbreak of the present dispute between us and our barons, we granted and confirmed by charter the freedom of the Church’s elections – a right reckoned to be of the greatest necessity and importance to it – and caused this to be confirmed by Pope Innocent III. This freedom we shall observe ourselves, and desire to be observed in good faith by our heirs in perpetuity.

One thing to note: elections doesn’t necessarily refer to democratic elections the way we use it today. It’s one of those words that has changed meaning over time, leading to confusion among some who study Church history.

But, has the English Church really been independent since Henry the VIII “nationalized” it in 1531? In his eagerness for a new wife, he declared himself the head of the Church. How can it claim to be independent today when its head is the chief of state in the United Kingdom?

Just another liberty taken away by a too powerful government. More to come, no doubt.

Anniversary of the Magna Carta

Over on The Corner, Iain Murray points out that today is the anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta. He points out a few provisions that are still valid in English Law, and wonders if they still will be come the 800th anniversary of the document in 2015. Among those he questions is:

FIRST, THAT WE HAVE GRANTED TO GOD, and by this present charter have confirmed for us and our heirs in perpetuity, that the English Church shall be free, and shall have its rights undiminished, and its liberties unimpaired. That we wish this so to be observed, appears from the fact that of our own free will, before the outbreak of the present dispute between us and our barons, we granted and confirmed by charter the freedom of the Church’s elections – a right reckoned to be of the greatest necessity and importance to it – and caused this to be confirmed by Pope Innocent III. This freedom we shall observe ourselves, and desire to be observed in good faith by our heirs in perpetuity.

One thing to note: elections doesn’t necessarily refer to democratic elections the way we use it today. It’s one of those words that has changed meaning over time, leading to confusion among some who study Church history.

But, has the English Church really been independent since Henry the VIII “nationalized” it in 1531? In his eagerness for a new wife, he declared himself the head of the Church. How can it claim to be independent today when its head is the chief of state in the United Kingdom?

Just another liberty taken away by a too powerful government. More to come, no doubt.

Philly City Council Rescinds Pro-Abrtion Resolution

Philly City Council backtracks on ‘pro-choice’ resolution

The City Council has repealed the resolution they passed declaring Philadelphia to be a pro-choice city. Looks like they’ve decided to show some love to their unborn brothers after all.

Five council members switched their vote at Thursday’s meeting and rescinded the symbolic declaration with a 13-4 vote.

Councilman Frank Rizzo, a Republican, sponsored the resolution to rescind, calling the whole situation an embarrassment.