Quote of the Day

“Harmony, liberal intercourse with all Nations, are recommended by policy, humanity and interest. But even our Commercial policy should hold an equal and impartial hand: neither seeking nor granting exclusive favours or preferences; consulting the natural course of things; diffusing and diversifying by gentle means the streams of Commerce, but forcing nothing; establishing with Powers so disposed; in order to give trade a stable course.”

— George Washington (Farewell Address, 19 September 1796)

Reference: Maxims of George Washington, Schroeder, ed. (71)

Book Review: Bad Twin

I took book out of the library last week after seeing something online reminding me that, although not dealing directly with the show “Lost,” it is set in the same “universe” and supposedly contains some clues about the mysteries contained in the show. So, I figured, what the heck, the library’s free so I took it out and read it this weekend while visiting family in Connecticut.

I just read the Lostpedia entry on Bad Twin (Note: link contains spoilers) and it notes that the producers of the show were very unhappy with the results of the book and seem to almost disown it. So, it’s usefulness in decoding the mysteries of the island may be very limited indeed.

While it does feature many elements in common with the series, the book never mentions the events of the crash, which is fitting considering that the book was “written” by one of the passengers on the ill-fated Oceanic 815 flight. (The “author” survived the crash but was the first to die on the island as he was the one sucked into the engine causing it to explode, in what was a pretty cool scene.) Themes covered in the book include primogeniture (leaving all inheritance to the oldest son), twins, the difference perspective makes in determining whether someone is good or evil, and the fact that wealth can in fact be a burden or curse, rather than a blessing.

I didn’t pick up anything that gave me any great insights into the mysteries of the show, but found it a nice, easy read that could be enjoyed even if you have never heard of Lost. It would make a decent beach read if you’re into that sort of thing.

Book Review: Bad Twin

I took book out of the library last week after seeing something online reminding me that, although not dealing directly with the show “Lost,” it is set in the same “universe” and supposedly contains some clues about the mysteries contained in the show. So, I figured, what the heck, the library’s free so I took it out and read it this weekend while visiting family in Connecticut.

I just read the Lostpedia entry on Bad Twin (Note: link contains spoilers) and it notes that the producers of the show were very unhappy with the results of the book and seem to almost disown it. So, it’s usefulness in decoding the mysteries of the island may be very limited indeed.

While it does feature many elements in common with the series, the book never mentions the events of the crash, which is fitting considering that the book was “written” by one of the passengers on the ill-fated Oceanic 815 flight. (The “author” survived the crash but was the first to die on the island as he was the one sucked into the engine causing it to explode, in what was a pretty cool scene.) Themes covered in the book include primogeniture (leaving all inheritance to the oldest son), twins, the difference perspective makes in determining whether someone is good or evil, and the fact that wealth can in fact be a burden or curse, rather than a blessing.

I didn’t pick up anything that gave me any great insights into the mysteries of the show, but found it a nice, easy read that could be enjoyed even if you have never heard of Lost. It would make a decent beach read if you’re into that sort of thing.

Book Review: Bad Twin

I took book out of the library last week after seeing something online reminding me that, although not dealing directly with the show “Lost,” it is set in the same “universe” and supposedly contains some clues about the mysteries contained in the show. So, I figured, what the heck, the library’s free so I took it out and read it this weekend while visiting family in Connecticut.

I just read the Lostpedia entry on Bad Twin (Note: link contains spoilers) and it notes that the producers of the show were very unhappy with the results of the book and seem to almost disown it. So, it’s usefulness in decoding the mysteries of the island may be very limited indeed.

While it does feature many elements in common with the series, the book never mentions the events of the crash, which is fitting considering that the book was “written” by one of the passengers on the ill-fated Oceanic 815 flight. (The “author” survived the crash but was the first to die on the island as he was the one sucked into the engine causing it to explode, in what was a pretty cool scene.) Themes covered in the book include primogeniture (leaving all inheritance to the oldest son), twins, the difference perspective makes in determining whether someone is good or evil, and the fact that wealth can in fact be a burden or curse, rather than a blessing.

I didn’t pick up anything that gave me any great insights into the mysteries of the show, but found it a nice, easy read that could be enjoyed even if you have never heard of Lost. It would make a decent beach read if you’re into that sort of thing.

Quote-a-palooza

“An election is coming. Universal peace is declared and the foxes have a sincere interest in prolonging the lives of the poultry.” – T.S. Eliot

“When they call the roll in the Senate, the senators do not know whether to answer ‘present’ or ‘guilty’.” – Theodore Roosevelt

“As Senators Obama and Clinton try to outdo each other in blaming government for our lack of individual responsibility and promising solutions by raising taxes to give us more government, they offer little change and less hope.” – Victor Davis Hanson

“Nothing… will assuage Clinton supporters’ sense of injustice if the upstart Obama supplants her. Their, and her, sense of entitlement is encapsulated in her constant invocations of her ’35 years’ of ‘experience.’ Well. She is 60. She left Yale Law School at age 25. Evidently she considers everything she has done since school, from her years at Little Rock’s Rose Law Firm to her good fortune with cattle futures, as presidentially relevant experience.” – George Will

“Hope must be grounded in objective truth otherwise it quickly becomes wishful thinking.” – Cal Thomas

“Eloquence is deep thought expressed in clear words.” – Peggy Noonan

“Why McCain? After all, somewhat similar allegations about recent Democratic nominees were precisely the sort of thing that [The New York Times] scrupulously avoided as trash journalism. And the Times’ attitude toward Bill Clinton’s various sex scandals was hardly one of unbridled enthusiasm. During those years, the Gray Lady published many, many articles lamenting the fever of ‘sexual McCarthyism’ in American politics. It seems that such concerns are unwarranted if the subject is a Republican.” – Jonah Goldberg

“Our elected officials don’t make America great, nor do temporal policies. America is great because of its people, its defining institutions and its freedoms.” – Linda Chavez

“Are the Democrats so intent on denying George Bush retroactive vindication for a war they insist is his that they would deny their own country a now-achievable victory?” – Charles Krauthammer

“The junior senator from New York is as spontaneous and emotion-laden as a space shuttle launch. It’s all planning, calculation and stage-management with the Clintons. She’s like the Tin Man in ‘The Wizard of Oz’: heartless, creaking her campaign joints and unable to prove the humanity voters want in a president.” – Jed Babbin

“McCain may seem unappealing when he’s debating policy with Mike Huckabee or even Mitt Romney. But let him start taking fire from Al Gore, Gloria Steinem, antiwar groups, environmental activists and teachers’ unions- not to mention The New York Times – and suddenly he will look lovelier than the Taj Mahal at sunset.” – Steve Chapman

“Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager said she will make a much better commander-in-chief than her rivals. She’s well schooled in the use of force. How many presidential candidates can honestly say that they have thrown a lamp at an important world leader?” – Argus Hamilton