Book Review: Bad Twin

I took book out of the library last week after seeing something online reminding me that, although not dealing directly with the show “Lost,” it is set in the same “universe” and supposedly contains some clues about the mysteries contained in the show. So, I figured, what the heck, the library’s free so I took it out and read it this weekend while visiting family in Connecticut.

I just read the Lostpedia entry on Bad Twin (Note: link contains spoilers) and it notes that the producers of the show were very unhappy with the results of the book and seem to almost disown it. So, it’s usefulness in decoding the mysteries of the island may be very limited indeed.

While it does feature many elements in common with the series, the book never mentions the events of the crash, which is fitting considering that the book was “written” by one of the passengers on the ill-fated Oceanic 815 flight. (The “author” survived the crash but was the first to die on the island as he was the one sucked into the engine causing it to explode, in what was a pretty cool scene.) Themes covered in the book include primogeniture (leaving all inheritance to the oldest son), twins, the difference perspective makes in determining whether someone is good or evil, and the fact that wealth can in fact be a burden or curse, rather than a blessing.

I didn’t pick up anything that gave me any great insights into the mysteries of the show, but found it a nice, easy read that could be enjoyed even if you have never heard of Lost. It would make a decent beach read if you’re into that sort of thing.

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Book Review: Bad Twin

I took book out of the library last week after seeing something online reminding me that, although not dealing directly with the show “Lost,” it is set in the same “universe” and supposedly contains some clues about the mysteries contained in the show. So, I figured, what the heck, the library’s free so I took it out and read it this weekend while visiting family in Connecticut.

I just read the Lostpedia entry on Bad Twin (Note: link contains spoilers) and it notes that the producers of the show were very unhappy with the results of the book and seem to almost disown it. So, it’s usefulness in decoding the mysteries of the island may be very limited indeed.

While it does feature many elements in common with the series, the book never mentions the events of the crash, which is fitting considering that the book was “written” by one of the passengers on the ill-fated Oceanic 815 flight. (The “author” survived the crash but was the first to die on the island as he was the one sucked into the engine causing it to explode, in what was a pretty cool scene.) Themes covered in the book include primogeniture (leaving all inheritance to the oldest son), twins, the difference perspective makes in determining whether someone is good or evil, and the fact that wealth can in fact be a burden or curse, rather than a blessing.

I didn’t pick up anything that gave me any great insights into the mysteries of the show, but found it a nice, easy read that could be enjoyed even if you have never heard of Lost. It would make a decent beach read if you’re into that sort of thing.

Book Review: Bad Twin

I took book out of the library last week after seeing something online reminding me that, although not dealing directly with the show “Lost,” it is set in the same “universe” and supposedly contains some clues about the mysteries contained in the show. So, I figured, what the heck, the library’s free so I took it out and read it this weekend while visiting family in Connecticut.

I just read the Lostpedia entry on Bad Twin (Note: link contains spoilers) and it notes that the producers of the show were very unhappy with the results of the book and seem to almost disown it. So, it’s usefulness in decoding the mysteries of the island may be very limited indeed.

While it does feature many elements in common with the series, the book never mentions the events of the crash, which is fitting considering that the book was “written” by one of the passengers on the ill-fated Oceanic 815 flight. (The “author” survived the crash but was the first to die on the island as he was the one sucked into the engine causing it to explode, in what was a pretty cool scene.) Themes covered in the book include primogeniture (leaving all inheritance to the oldest son), twins, the difference perspective makes in determining whether someone is good or evil, and the fact that wealth can in fact be a burden or curse, rather than a blessing.

I didn’t pick up anything that gave me any great insights into the mysteries of the show, but found it a nice, easy read that could be enjoyed even if you have never heard of Lost. It would make a decent beach read if you’re into that sort of thing.