Quote-a-palooza

“The latent causes of faction are thus sown in the nature of man.” – James Madison

“The urge to save humanity is almost always a false-face for the urge to rule it.” – H. L. Mencken

“Here are the Obama rules in detail: He can’t be called a ‘liberal’ (‘the same names and labels they pin on everyone,’ as Obama puts it); his toughness on the war on terror can’t be questioned (‘attempts to play on our fears’); his extreme positions on social issues can’t be exposed (‘the same efforts to distract us from the issues that affect our lives’ and ‘turn us against each other’); and his Chicago background too is off-limits (‘pouncing on every gaffe and association and fake controversy’). Besides that, it should be a freewheeling and spirited campaign.” – Rich Lowry

“No one bothers to consider what those working whites in North Carolina, Indiana and the other big states that Mr. Obama couldn’t win find suspicious about the man from Illinois. Maybe it’s the company he keeps in Chicago, the crazy bigoted preacher, the unrepentant and unredeemed terrorists, the sleazy slumlords. Maybe the working stiffs don’t trust his wife, who decided America was OK only when it looked like Americans might reward her with a lease on a big house on Pennsylvania Avenue. Maybe it’s the mystery about the why and how he keeps so much hidden in the shadows. Maybe it’s the change they can’t believe in.” – Wesley Pruden

“We pick presidents for their judgment and values. Anything that gives us a clue as to what those might be is not only fair game, it is the game.” – Jonah Goldberg

“[John] McCain should begin identifying people who have overcome poverty and let them tell their stories of how they did it. Those stories are better than the stories of people mired in poverty, largely because of wrong decisions, who are doomed to remain there because they’ve been told the best they can hope for is a government check. Success becomes an example for others to follow.” – Cal Thomas

“After the coldest April in 11 years, John McCain offers a ‘market friendly’ approach to global warming- saying we ‘have a genius for adapting, solving problems.’ But shouldn’t the problems be real?…[W]e were disappointed when, at an Oregon wind turbine manufacturer on Monday, [McCain] seemed to embrace the shaky environmentalist position on global warming. Saying the costs of our reliance on fossil fuels ‘have added up now in the atmosphere, in the oceans and all across the natural world,’ he proposed that by 2050, the U.S. should reduce CO2 emissions to a level 60% below that emitted in 1990. The question is, why? Cold water was thrown on the climate-change disaster hypothesis by the National Climate Data Center’s recent announcement that last month was the coldest April in more than a decade and the 29th coolest since record keeping began 114 years ago. The average temperature was 1 degree cooler than the average April temperature of the entire 20th century. A few weeks ago, as North America was emerging from one of its coldest and snowiest winters in decades, the climate center issued a statement saying that snow cover on the Eurasian land mass had been the most extensive ever recorded, and that this March had been only the 63rd warmest since 1895. On April 24, the World Wildlife Fund published a study, based on last September’s data, showing that Arctic ice had shrunk from 13 million square kilometers to just 3 million. What the WWF omitted was that by March the Arctic ice had recovered to 14 million square kilometers and that the ice cover around the Bering Strait and Alaska was at the highest level ever recorded… We were pleased that McCain endorsed nuclear power as a pollution-free source of energy that can help us toward energy independence while reducing emissions. But the fact is that we will need more energy, not less, by 2050, from all sources. Both economic and technological growth will demand more… Global warming is debatable, both as to its causes and its effects. By taking the lead on domestic energy, McCain could help solve a real problem and make a clear distinction between himself and his head-in-the-tundra opponents.” – Investor’s Business Daily

“Taking the high road is the high-minded approach to campaigning, but the high road can lead to disappointing places. That’s why successful pols usually look for alternate routes, just in case.” – Wesley Pruden

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