Detainees

A few points I haven’t seen amid all of the discussion of the supremely stupid Supreme Court decision regarding the detention of non-lawful combatants: If we have to give them all the rights of an American citizen, we’ll either either not take them prisoner, leaving them either free to commit more acts of violence, or dead “while resisting arrest,” or we won’t even admit to taking prisoners and who knows what will happen to them then.

Guantanamo was the best solution because it already afforded them more rights than they were due as a result of their terrorist actions, while keeping Americans safe. All this decision did was assert a false to judicial supremacy while endangering American lives, which used to be the primary concern of the government.

Detainees

A few points I haven’t seen amid all of the discussion of the supremely stupid Supreme Court decision regarding the detention of non-lawful combatants: If we have to give them all the rights of an American citizen, we’ll either either not take them prisoner, leaving them either free to commit more acts of violence, or dead “while resisting arrest,” or we won’t even admit to taking prisoners and who knows what will happen to them then.

Guantanamo was the best solution because it already afforded them more rights than they were due as a result of their terrorist actions, while keeping Americans safe. All this decision did was assert a false to judicial supremacy while endangering American lives, which used to be the primary concern of the government.

Why Atheists aren’t skeptical enough

Touchstone Archives: The Skeptical Inquirer

All of the people who say that they are “atheists through skepticism, because they see no evidence that God exists,” are patently unthinking people, since by virtue of turning skeptic, no one has ever done anything—employed any logic, gathered any evidence, found any way forward—to reach a conclusion about whether God exists. So these atheists have not reached a conclusion; they have made a commitment.

What the scientific skeptic ought to say is this: “Having examined the hard evidence, we declare that route to be exhausted. The only kind of evidence for God’s existence that counts will have to be of some other kind—if there is any other kind.”

As they say, read the whole thing.

Hat Tip: Insight Scoop

19 Years ago this past Sunday…

On June 8, 1989, the Pittsburgh Pirates scored 10 runs in the first inning against the Phillies, sending 16 men to the plate in one inning. It was only the first inning, though, and the game proved Yogi Berra’s maxim that it ain’t over ’til it’s over.

Although the Pirates left the bases loaded, with a 10-run lead, the Pirates doubtless were unconcerned. They had good reason: By the time the Pirates made the last out of the inning, the win expectancy of the Phillies clocked in at just 1.6 percent

Pirates broadcaster Jim Rooker might not be a devotee of win percentage charts. But he was a former player, a member of the Pirates’ 1979 World Championship team. As such, he knew that 10-run first inning leads were pretty secure. Confident in that knowledge, he made a statement that he would soon regret: “If we lose this game, I’ll walk home.”

You can probably guess where this is heading. …

I was at that game with my grandfather and younger cousin. I made a pronouncement as definitive as Rooker did, though fortunately without the promise of walking home. I mean, really, who would have thought Steve Freakin’ Jeltz could hit two home runs in a season, much less a game? He only had five for his career! (Link to box-score.) Also, see an amusing story about Steve Jeltz and his lack of hitting ability.

But this game is a prime example of why baseball’s the best damn sport there is. It truly “ain’t over till it’s over.” As the great Earl Weaver once said:

You can’t sit on a lead and run a few plays into the line and just kill the clock. You’ve got to throw the ball over the damn plate and give the other man his chance. That’s why baseball is the greatest game of them all.

On this there can be no debate.