If you think Christians are unscientific and gullible, check out atheists

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While 31% of people who never worship expressed strong belief in these things, only 8% of people who attend a house of worship more than once a week did.

Even among Christians, there were disparities. While 36% of those belonging to the United Church of Christ, Sen. Barack Obama’s former denomination, expressed strong beliefs in the paranormal, only 14% of those belonging to the Assemblies of God, Sarah Palin’s former denomination, did. In fact, the more traditional and evangelical the respondent, the less likely he was to believe in, for instance, the possibility of communicating with people who are dead.

This is not a new finding. In his 1983 book “The Whys of a Philosophical Scrivener,” skeptic and science writer Martin Gardner cited the decline of traditional religious belief among the better educated as one of the causes for an increase in pseudoscience, cults and superstition. He referenced a 1980 study published in the magazine Skeptical Inquirer that showed irreligious college students to be by far the most likely to embrace paranormal beliefs, while born-again Christian college students were the least likely.

Surprisingly, while increased church attendance and membership in a conservative denomination has a powerful negative effect on paranormal beliefs, higher education doesn’t. Two years ago two professors published another study in Skeptical Inquirer showing that, while less than one-quarter of college freshmen surveyed expressed a general belief in such superstitions as ghosts, psychic healing, haunted houses, demonic possession, clairvoyance and witches, the figure jumped to 31% of college seniors and 34% of graduate students.

Of course, for full disclosure, I believe in demonic possession. But the “rationalist” point of view that colleges are theoretically teaching should be undermining, rather than promoting beliefs such as those listed in the last paragraph above.

Self-described atheists don’t even seem to have the courage of their own convictions:

We can’t even count on self-described atheists to be strict rationalists. According to the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life’s monumental “U.S. Religious Landscape Survey” that was issued in June, 21% of self-proclaimed atheists believe in either a personal God or an impersonal force. Ten percent of atheists pray at least weekly and 12% believe in heaven.

Make sure to read the whole thing, as there’s a good focus on Bill Maher who likes to claim that religious believers are irrational and unthinking even as he denies germ theory, believes aspirin is lethal and denies that the Salk vaccine prevents polio.

Hat Tip: First Things

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2 thoughts on “If you think Christians are unscientific and gullible, check out atheists

  1. “21% of self-proclaimed atheists believe in either a personal God or an impersonal force. Ten percent of atheists pray at least weekly and 12% believe in heaven.”

    Um, my dictionary must be a bit out of date. Wouldn’t that make them theists? Maybe they’re praying in someone/something they don’t believe in. Perhaps that last 12% believe in heaven but no Creator.

  2. I think the key point in the sentence you quote is “self-proclaimed.” I think there’s a sort of “coolness” factor to being an atheist so that people will self-identify as such, even when it’s in contradiction to some of their actual beliefs.

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