Quote of the Day

“Since private and publick Vices, are in Reality, though not always apparently, so nearly connected, of how much Importance, how necessary is it, that the utmost Pains be taken by the Publick, to have the Principles of Virtue early inculcated on the Minds even of children, and the moral Sense kept alive, and that the wise institutions of our Ancestors for these great Purposes be encouraged by the Government. For no people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffusd and Virtue is preservd. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauchd in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders.”

–Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, 4 November 1775

Quote of the Day

“Since private and publick Vices, are in Reality, though not always apparently, so nearly connected, of how much Importance, how necessary is it, that the utmost Pains be taken by the Publick, to have the Principles of Virtue early inculcated on the Minds even of children, and the moral Sense kept alive, and that the wise institutions of our Ancestors for these great Purposes be encouraged by the Government. For no people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffusd and Virtue is preservd. On the Contrary, when People are universally ignorant, and debauchd in their Manners, they will sink under their own weight without the Aid of foreign Invaders.”

–Samuel Adams, letter to James Warren, 4 November 1775

Quote of the Day

“Public virtue cannot exist in a nation without private, and public virtue is the only foundation of republics. There must be a positive passion for the public good, the public interest, honour, power and glory, established in the minds of the people, or there can be no republican government, nor any real liberty: and this public passion must be superiour to all private passions.”

–John Adams, letter to Mercy Warren, 16 April 1776

Quote of the Day

“The virtues of men are of more consequence to society than their abilities; and for this reason, the heart should be cultivated with more assiduity than the head.”

–Noah Webster, On the Education of Youth in America, 1788

Quote of the Day

“No compact among men … can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no Wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other.”

–George Washington, draft of first Inaugural Address, April 1789

Quote of the Day

“No compact among men … can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no Wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other.”

–George Washington, draft of first Inaugural Address, April 1789

Quote of the Day

“No compact among men … can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no Wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other.”

–George Washington, draft of first Inaugural Address, April 1789

Quote of the Day

This Illinois Senate-seat news is outrageous and shameful. That said, it warms my heart. Finally, a political scandal you can talk to your children about. No room at the Mayflower. No myspace page. No Gay-American announcement. Just good and evil and money and power corrupting. — Kathryn Jean Lopez

Quote-a-palooza

“One of the weirdest, most perceptually jarring things about the economic crisis is that everything looks the same. We are told every day and in every news venue that we are in Great Depression II, that we are in a crisis, a cataclysm, a meltdown, the credit crunch from hell, that we will lose millions of jobs, and that the great abundance is over and may never return. … And yet when you free yourself from media and go outside for a walk, everything looks . . . the same.” –Wall Street Journal columnist Peggy Noonan

“Unemployment is still below 7 percent; it was around 25 percent when Franklin Roosevelt became president. Less than 20 banks have failed, not the 4,000 that went under in the first part of 1933.” –Hoover Institution historian Victor Davis Hanson

“I desperately hope that circumstances will force Obama to repudiate his past. At present we do not know whether this will happen; and so far, I have seen nothing to suggest that it will. Unlike those who see in the emerging shape of his administration evidence that he will be a pragmatic centrist, I do not think it necessarily shows anything of the kind.” –British journalist Melanie Phillips

“If we don’t know the constitutional limits placed on Congress and the White House, politicians can do just about anything they wish to control our lives, from deciding what kind of light bulbs we can use to whether the government can take over our health care system or bailout failing businesses. We just think Congress can do anything upon which they can get a majority vote.” –George Mason University economics professor Walter E. Williams

“Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.” –President Ronald Reagan (1911-2004)

“The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.” –British author and economist Herbert Spencer (1820-1903)

“Reaching consensus in a group is often confused with finding the right answer.” –American writer Norman Mailer (1923-2007)

“If you don’t read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed.” –American author and humorist Mark Twain (1835-1910)

“In the old days — from the Venetian Republic to, oh, the Bear Stearns rescue — if you wanted to get rich, you did it the Warren Buffett way: You learned to read balance sheets. Today you learn to read political tea leaves. If you want to make money on Wall Street (or keep from losing your shirt), you do it not by anticipating Intel’s third-quarter earnings but by guessing instead what side of the bed Henry Paulson will wake up on tomorrow.” –columnist Charles Krauthammer

“We’ve moved beyond show me the money. This is throw me the money.” –economist Lawrence Kudlow

“The costs of Washington’s bailout fiesta are now so huge, you can see them from space. The latest number, which includes the Citigroup rescue, is $7.7 trillion. That’s roughly half of America’s GDP.” –National Review editor Jonah Goldberg

“Bill Clinton agreed to extensive scrutiny to help get Hillary the secretary of state post. He may have to give up his speaking engagements. As secretary of state, Hillary Clinton will have to grapple with age-old battles between mortal enemies, like Sunnis and Shiites, Israelis and Palestinians, and Bill Clinton and spare time.” –comedian Argus Hamilton

Jay Leno: tell you, the economy is bad. In fact — you know the White House turkey? Turned down the pardon. Said all his money’s in the market. Nothing left to live for. … In political news, President-elect Barack Obama has named Hillary Clinton as his secretary of state. I am no political expert. I don’t pretend to know much about international affairs. But speaking strictly as a late-night talk show host, a Clinton back in office? Yes!

Quote-a-palooza

“One of the weirdest, most perceptually jarring things about the economic crisis is that everything looks the same. We are told every day and in every news venue that we are in Great Depression II, that we are in a crisis, a cataclysm, a meltdown, the credit crunch from hell, that we will lose millions of jobs, and that the great abundance is over and may never return. … And yet when you free yourself from media and go outside for a walk, everything looks . . . the same.” –Wall Street Journal columnist Peggy Noonan

“Unemployment is still below 7 percent; it was around 25 percent when Franklin Roosevelt became president. Less than 20 banks have failed, not the 4,000 that went under in the first part of 1933.” –Hoover Institution historian Victor Davis Hanson

“I desperately hope that circumstances will force Obama to repudiate his past. At present we do not know whether this will happen; and so far, I have seen nothing to suggest that it will. Unlike those who see in the emerging shape of his administration evidence that he will be a pragmatic centrist, I do not think it necessarily shows anything of the kind.” –British journalist Melanie Phillips

“If we don’t know the constitutional limits placed on Congress and the White House, politicians can do just about anything they wish to control our lives, from deciding what kind of light bulbs we can use to whether the government can take over our health care system or bailout failing businesses. We just think Congress can do anything upon which they can get a majority vote.” –George Mason University economics professor Walter E. Williams

“Government’s view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.” –President Ronald Reagan (1911-2004)

“The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools.” –British author and economist Herbert Spencer (1820-1903)

“Reaching consensus in a group is often confused with finding the right answer.” –American writer Norman Mailer (1923-2007)

“If you don’t read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed.” –American author and humorist Mark Twain (1835-1910)

“In the old days — from the Venetian Republic to, oh, the Bear Stearns rescue — if you wanted to get rich, you did it the Warren Buffett way: You learned to read balance sheets. Today you learn to read political tea leaves. If you want to make money on Wall Street (or keep from losing your shirt), you do it not by anticipating Intel’s third-quarter earnings but by guessing instead what side of the bed Henry Paulson will wake up on tomorrow.” –columnist Charles Krauthammer

“We’ve moved beyond show me the money. This is throw me the money.” –economist Lawrence Kudlow

“The costs of Washington’s bailout fiesta are now so huge, you can see them from space. The latest number, which includes the Citigroup rescue, is $7.7 trillion. That’s roughly half of America’s GDP.” –National Review editor Jonah Goldberg

“Bill Clinton agreed to extensive scrutiny to help get Hillary the secretary of state post. He may have to give up his speaking engagements. As secretary of state, Hillary Clinton will have to grapple with age-old battles between mortal enemies, like Sunnis and Shiites, Israelis and Palestinians, and Bill Clinton and spare time.” –comedian Argus Hamilton

Jay Leno: tell you, the economy is bad. In fact — you know the White House turkey? Turned down the pardon. Said all his money’s in the market. Nothing left to live for. … In political news, President-elect Barack Obama has named Hillary Clinton as his secretary of state. I am no political expert. I don’t pretend to know much about international affairs. But speaking strictly as a late-night talk show host, a Clinton back in office? Yes!